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Our world needs creativity to cope with and to solve a myriad of problems. Gail Godwin once said, “Good teaching is one-fourth preparation and three-fourths theater.” People have always valued and appreciated creativity, and art is a medium for expressing one’s individuality and creativity. The teacher who greets children in creative ways will soon win their hearts. To get pupils’ attention, make them smile and tweak their interest in learning, consider the following tips.
Seasonal greetings

Autumn greetings. Don a straw hat, some patches on your clothes and show up as a scarecrow! Another day wear a garland of silk leaves around your head or neck - or pin individual silk leaves to your clothing.

Children love to be creative and they especially love to express themselves. This short poem will capture their attention and draw them right into the creative process.

Leaves

All join hands and circle round
While we watch the leaves fall down
See them twirling to the ground,
See them dancing all around.
See them skipping here and there,
See them flipping in the air.
Autumn leaves so peacefully
Falling, falling from the tree.

One morning, bring tiny gourds or pumpkins and let each child choose one as they enter. They can decorate them with markers or stickers.

Winter greetings. Wear a jingle bell necklace and bracelet. Have each student shake your hand to make the bells jingle! Tape paper snowflakes to your clothing or make a snowflake necklace with plastic, glittery ornaments. On another day, don an apron and fill the pockets with treats - candy canes, packets of instant cocoa or individually wrapped treats. Children can save these for snack time - but be sure to consider any student allergies when selecting treats.

Spring greetings. Make a garland or a headband with silk flowers, buzzy bees, butterflies or hummingbirds. You can also pin them individually to your clothing to announce the season of spring. One day, bring a kite to class and hang it near the door. Aim a floor fan at the kite’s tail to make it dance in the breeze.

Apron-pocket treats. Give children stickers of birds and flowers, plastic eggs with something inside or a packet of pretty flower seeds to plant in your school garden. You can also pass out tiny construction paper kites for students to decorate.

Summer greetings. Attach seashells or starfish to a netting and drape it over the doorway so students will have to walk under it. Hang a beach ball in front of a fan and watch it bob and bounce. Fill a sand bucket with treats for snack time. Show children how to make accordion-fold paper fans. Pass out summer theme coloring sheets. Consider placing a big beach umbrella in the story corner. Sit on “beach” towels during story time.

When teachers greet their students in creative ways, they also get a jump start on that day’s lessons. By perking their interest in a certain subject, season or event, you help students focus in the classroom. They will also look forward to returning to class each day - just to see what surprises the teacher has in store!

Here are some poems for kids that are cute, funny and very good for memorizing. Some are about school and their friends there.

We are glad to see you!

The ship is sailing,

The flag is waving,

Hello, my friends!

Hello, my friends.

The sun is shining,

The stars are smiling

Hello, my friends,

Hello!

The Happiest!

Mother gives me love and care.
Father shows me how to fare.
Friends give me joy and fun.
Uncles buy me toys that run.
Granny tells me tales at night.
Brother spares his bike and kite.
Sister plays some tricks that please.
Teachers help me learn with ease.
I am the happiest you can see.
To have them all here with me.

Whether it’s humorous words about school lunch or an inspirational poem for the kid who doesn’t excel in sports, they’ll really appreciate how much you are clued in to what they are going through each and every day.

Way up high in the apple tree (stretch both arms above your head, hands open).

Two little apples smiled at me (keep arms above head, close hands into fists).

I shook that tree as hard as I could (keep arms above head, “shake” tree).

Down came the apples (bring fists down toward stomach.

Mmmm, they were good! (rub stomach).

These Rhyming Games can be a fun way to practice each other’s names and remember the words.

Who ate the cookie in the cookie jar?
(Child’s name) ate the cookie in the cookie jar.
Who me? (First child responds.)
Yes you! (Class chants.)
Couldn’t be. (First child answers.)
Then who? (Class chants.)

Second child’s name ate the cookie in the cookie jar...
The chant continues as you use each child’s name.

MR. ALLIGATOR

Mr. Alligator, Mr. Alligator,

Don’t you bite! (wag finger to say no)

Don’t you bite!

I will run away from you, (running motion with hands)

I will run away from you,

Out of sight, (hands hide face)

Out of sight.

Baby Bunny Action Rhyme

Baby bunny bounces high; (Jump high)

Baby bunny bounces low; (jump low)

Baby bunny blinks his eyes; (Blink eyes)

Baby Bunny waves good-bye. (Wave good-bye)

Doggy, Doggy

Doggy, Doggy, where’s your bone?

Somebody stole it from your home.

Guess who! Maybe you...

Maybe the monkeys from the zoo.

Wake up doggy, find your bone.

How to play

How to play

Alternative 1: (this is the one I use) have an adult give the bone (or whatever you choose to hide... a shoe works too) to one of the children while chanting the song (make sure you give each child a chance to have the bone). Have all of the children hide their hands behind their backs. When the chant is over, the doggy can uncover his or her eyes and gets 3 guesses as to which person has the bone. Whether the doggy gets it right or not, the person with the bone gets to be the next doggy. Because you’ve made sure to give each child a turn with the bone, each child will get a turn being the doggy.

Alternative 2: (more competitive) have the last person who was the doggy, give the bone (or whatever you choose to hide) to one of the other children while everyone chants the song. Have all the children hide their hands behind their backs. When the chant is over, the doggy can uncover his or her eyes and get 3 guesses as to which person has the bone. If they guess where the bone is, they get to sit outside the circle and the person with the bone is the doggy. If they don’t guess where the bone is, they have to be the doggy again.

Five Little Monkeys

Actions

* Five little monkeys - with one hand hold up the number of fingers to match the verse.
* Jumping on the bed - bounce your fingers (monkeys) up and down on your other hand (the bed)
* One fell off - hold up one finger
* And bumped his head - hold head with both hands and rock head back and forth
* Mama called the Doctor and the Doctor said - dial the phone with one finger
* No more monkeys jumping on the bed - shake index finger (“no no”)

Words

Five little monkeys jumping on the bed,

One fell off and bumped his head.

Mama called the Doctor and the Doctor said,

“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

Four little monkeys jumping on the bed,

One fell off and bumped her head.

Papa called the Doctor and the Doctor said,

“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

Three little monkeys jumping on the bed,

One fell off and bumped his head.

Mama called the Doctor and the Doctor said,

“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

Two little monkeys jumping on the bed,

One fell off and bumped her head.

Papa called the Doctor and the Doctor said,

“No more monkeys jumping on the bed!”

One little monkey jumping on the bed,

He fell off and bumped his head.

Mama called the Doctor and the Doctor said,

“Put those monkeys straight to bed!”

Ladybug! Ladybug!

Fly away home.

Your house is on fire.

And your children all gone.

All except one,

And that’s little Ann,

For she crept under

The frying pan.

“If You Should Meet an Elephant”

If you should meet a crocodile on a spring-time day

What would you do? What would you say?

I’d say, “Good morning Crocodile, how do you do?

I’m glad to meet you Crocodile, I’d like to dance with you.”

If you should meet an elephant on a summer’s day

What would you do? What would you say?

I’d say, “Good morning Elephant, how do you do?

I’m glad to meet you Elephant, I’d like to dance with you.”

If you should meet a stinky skunk on an autumn day

What would you do? What would you say?

I’d say, “Good morning Stinky Skunk, how do you do?

I’m glad to meet you Stinky Skunk, I’d like to dance with you.”

If you should meet a polar bear on a winter day

What would you do? What would you say?

I’d say, “Good morning Polar Bear, how do you do?

I’m glad to meet you polar bear, I’d like to dance with you.”

Education should provide children with the tools to shape the world they live in, enabling them to critically access issues which not only affect them, but also those which impact the people around them.

Using poems and songs during English lessons make them brighter, more interesting. So, I hope I’ve shown how teachers can use songs and poems at their lessons.

Автор: 

Снітка Юлія Сергіївна, вчитель англійської мови І кваліфікаційної категорії КЗ "Гімназія № 7" м.Нікополя Дніпропетровської області

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